How to Upgrade PHP and MySQL on your Virtual or Dedicated Server July 2015

How to Upgrade PHP and MySQL on your Virtual or Dedicated Server for Wordpress

Servers Running WordPress

Servers running WordPress need to upgrade their PHP beyond the default installation to be able to install the current upgrade of WordPress.

Using Yum

Normally this would not be a major problem with the use of Yum, but as of this writing Yum does not have in its repositories PHP's newest upgrade. WordPress requires PHP 5.24 for its newest upgrade and Yum's highest upgrade for PHP is only 5.16.

Although there are many Yum repositories on the Internet offering PHP upgrades few offer all the packages needed for a clean upgrade. The problem being that if you have PHP items on your server not included in the upgrade repository these items will not work after you upgrade.

Trusted PHP and MySQL Repositories

After a long search I have found the repositories to do a clean PHP and MySQL upgrade. I have tested this on my Godaddy Virtual Server with complete success.

These are the EPEL and REMI repositories.

EPEL stands for the Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux. It is a volunteer-based community effort from the Fedora project. They create a repository of high quality add-on packages for Red Hat and its spinoffs such as CentOS.

Remi is a repository created by Remi Collet aimed at giving support for the old Fedora releases to allow them to install recent software.

Steps to Upgrade PHP and MYSQL

First you need to log into your server via SSH using the "su -" command for root access.

Then at the SSH prompt add the next three lines below without the hash marks, one at a time pressing enter after each line.

# wget http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/epel/5/i386/epel-release-5-4.noarch.rpm

# wget http://rpms.famillecollet.com/enterprise/remi-release-5.rpm

# rpm -Uvh remi-release-5*.rpm epel-release-5*.rpm

Now to upgrade your PHP and MYSQL enter the line below.

yum --enablerepo=remi update php php-* mysql

Now you will need to restart Apache with the command below.

/etc/init.d/httpd restart

That's it, your done.

You can now check your PHP version with the command # php -v

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